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Anecdote speech preparation outline assignment This outl

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Anecdote speech preparation outline assignment
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This outline is due on Canvas to the Anecdote speech outline assignment slot on the due date on the course schedule. This outline must be complete and adequately detailed in order to earn any credit for the speech itself.
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This outline is a major part of the speech grade (as well as being required to earn any speech points) so make sure all of the parts are there to feel the most prepared and earn the best grade possible! This is also where I will post my feedback, comments and grade for the whole speech (this is why it says it is worth “60 points”).
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Your required full-content outline must have all of these elements:
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General purpose
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Specific purpose
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Attention getter
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Significance (Why is it important information for them? Why should they listen?)
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Thesis statement
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Complete preview of main points w/signposts (remember, one brief sentence!)
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2 main points with at least 2 subpoints per main point—give me detail!
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Complete transitional statements in between main points
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Summary (as Spongebob says, “bring it around town.” Try mentioning something from the attention getter/significance here.)
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Concluding statement
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The blank anecdote outline template will help you with organization. The parts of the outline are already labeled, so you can just insert your information.
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The outline you are required to turn in for this speech is a full-content outline. The entire outline should have complete sentences and be detailed. Write everything out as complete sentences.
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If you are wondering how long this outline should be, the best guideline is “80/20”. 80% of the outline should be the body of the speech, and 20% should be the introduction and conclusion. Eyeball your outline to see if yours matches this—and if not, you need more in the body of the speech.
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For the anecdote speech, I can tell you that (if you are single-spacing the outline) it should be somewhere between 1 ¼-2 pages. But I would do the “80/20” test for sure.
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Remember there is a sample anecdote outline on Canvas, and there is a sample anecdote speech video in the “video links” section of the first module.
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Make sure the main points are roughly equal in length.
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Your supporting material for this speech will probably use some of the following types of support: Personal experience, common knowledge, direct observation, examples, etc. Outside research (academic journal articles etc.) are not required for this speech.
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Note the preview of main points and transition statements (summary of previous point, preview of next point).
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If you would like feedback on the outline before you give your speech, do the following:
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Submit the outline on Canvas (in the outline assignment slot)
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Message me that you would like feedback on the outline
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Ask for feedback at least 3 days before your speech so I have time to give you feedback (it’s still subject to my availability but you have very good chances)
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I will message you back when it’s done—refer to the “how to see comments/feedback on Canvas” instructions in the first module on Canvas for how to see my comments
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If you plan on revising your outline to turn it in again by the deadline, just turn in your revised outline to the same slot and I will use the most recent version for speech credit.
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You will not receive feedback via email—only on Canvas.
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A couple of things to remember:
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Presenting a speech is not like writing an essay–writing the outline is only half of the process. Allow yourself enough time for practice as well.
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Keep in mind, the way the class is designed, if you miss one of the major speeches, you will not pass the class, so make sure you complete them all, following the assignment for that speech.
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A few reminders (from the video lecture for the Anecdote Speech Assignment):
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The significance is the same as the specific purpose–one sentence, directed toward us (the audience), that tells us the life lesson we should get out of the speech.
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The thesis is the general idea of the whole speech. It is one sentence and is a statement, not a question.
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The preview is one sentence that tells us what the main points are. It includes signposts to separate the main points from one another.
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Examples of signposts: first, second, third, next, finally, last
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Not an example of a signpost: and
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Preview examples:
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Today, I will talk about First, meeting my best friend in 3rd grade, and Second, basketball camp.
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First, I will go over my family’s struggle with new triplets, and Next, dealing with my grandfather’s Alzheimer’s.
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The transition is one sentence that summarizes your previous point and previews the next point.
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Transition examples:
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Now that I’ve talked about meeting my best friend, basketball camp was the very next summer.
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My family found our footing with the triplets, only to be bombarded soon with my grandfather’s deterioration due to Alzheimer’s.
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The conclusion: (remember, there shouldn’t be any new information in the conclusion)
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The summary is a general summary of the speech. You don’t have to list every main point here, again.
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The concluding statement is one final sentence that tells the audience you are finished. Have a strong conclusion here.
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Often, the conclusion is an appeal to the audience, or a memorable thought, or a reference to the attention getter (the Spongebob–referring to the “Bring it Around Town” dance because that’s what you’re doing with the speech). Check out the chapter on conclusions to see more ideas.

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